Protein Storage – A Time Bomb!

Obese people have both high concentrations of fats and excessive amounts of protein in the blood. The blood's tendency towards clotting, considered to be the greatest cause for heart attack or stroke, stems almost exclusively from the saturation of proteins in the blood. (Note that smoking also increases blood protein concentrations, as shown below). Fats, on the other hand, have no blood-clotting ability. In their attempt to avert a heart attack, the capillary cells absorb the excess protein, convert it into collagen fiber, and store it in their basal membranes. Although this emergency response has a blood-thinning and, therefore, life-saving effect, it also makes the blood walls thicker and more vulnerable to injury.

Examinations of connective tissue in obese people have proved that it contains not only plump fat cells, but also large amounts of dense collagen-fiber. Collagen is 100 percent pure protein. Building more collagen-fiber than normally needed is one of the main emergency measures the body takes to deal with dangerously high protein concentrations in the blood. By removing the protein from the blood and theby putting it out of circulation, the blood becomes thin and a major crisis is avoided. But the situation changes drastically when the body's 'protein stores' are all filled up to capacity, and protein consumption continues. This time, the blood becomes and remains aligned with protein. In such a case, the blood begins to permanently thicken and develop a tendency towards clotting.

Without the afflicted person takes aspirin, which has a blood-thinning effect, a stroke or heart attack may occur. Yet in the long term, aspirin not only fails to prevent such an accident but strongly encourages it. A heightened risk of deadly uncontrolled bleeding may also result from regular or excessive use of aspirin. In addition, once aspirin treatment discontinues, the risk of suffering a heart attack is greatly increased.

Warning: If you suffer from macular degeneration, the # 1 cause of blindness in people over 55 years old, avoid taking aspirin. Also avoid smoking. Recent research found that smoking is the leading cause of macular degeneration; half of all smokers develop it. As soon as a person stops smoking, the risk lessens by one third. A major study linked aspirin to America's epidemic of macular degeneration. The often prescribed one-aspirin-a-day routine makes the retinas more likely to hemorrhage. Beside, aspirin belongs to the same class of painkillers as Vioxx, Celebrex and Aleve, all of which were found to increase heart attack and stroke risk by over 50 percent.

Tests have shown that abstaining from food for a periodic length of time reduces the size and amount of both fat cells and collagen fiber deposits. This also demonstrates that overeating protein does, in fact, increase protein tissue in the body. As explained before, and to emphasize this crucial point, the protein deposits accumulate in the basal membranes of the capillary walls and the connective tissues that surround the cells. As a direct consequence of this development, the thickened blood vessel walls are no longer capable of absorbing sufficient amounts of oxygen, water, and nutrients, and since they can not remove all the metabolic waste products that the cells produce.

Therefore, the cells that make up these blood vessels become orphaned and ultimately die from malnutrition, suffocation and dehydration. In a young person, the main blood vessels of the heart have a diameter of about 3mm. By regularly overeating protein foods, the typically smooth and polished inner wall of a blood vessel becomes uneven, and the blood vessel as a whole thickens and loses its elasticity. This leads to a deterioration of blood flow through the circulatory system and may culminate in a complete blockage. Coronary arteries that are totally blocked earthquake old rusty, calcified water pipes. Their walls are brownish-red and are clogged with yellowish, calcified material.